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Papers & Presentations

EDUCASE 2014

Understanding and Improving the Student Technology Experience

Presented By: Peg Sherven, Office of Information Technology
Date(s): March 18, 2014
Location: Chicago, IL

What does the "student technology experience" mean at your institution? Discover what we learned about our students from the 2013 Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) survey and our Make Moodle Better formal community of practice. Our findings have helped us better understand our students' preferences for technology related to online classes, our LMS (Moodle), and faculty technology usage. The results have aided in establishing priorities, identifying opportunities, and improving student services and programming. We'll share how it's making a difference on our campus. Special thanks to Marie Zimmerman, UMN graphic designer.

Presentation Resources: Poster Link is a PDF file. 

ASHE 2013

The Impact of the Student Experience on Time to the Doctorate: An Event History Analysis Utilizing Exit Survey Data

Presented By: Daniel R. Jones-White, OIR and Olena Glushko, University of Minnesota
Date(s): November 14, 2013
Location: St. Louis, MO

Utilizing data collected from an institution’s administration of the AGS/AUU Doctoral Exit Survey, this study explores if the doctoral student experience is related to doctoral completion times. Specifically, this study attempts to identify the underlying dimensions of doctoral student attitudes about their experiences in graduate school and how these dimensions of doctoral student experiences impact on time required to complete their doctoral degree. Results demonstrate that student satisfaction with the program, advisor/faculty satisfaction, and perceptions of program related obstacles are associated with completion times which suggests practical targets for program improvement.

Presentation Resources: Paper Link is a PDF file.  Online Presentation Link to an external file or site. 

STEMming the Tide? Investigating the Outcomes of Formal Research Opportunities for Undergraduate Women in STEM Programs

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Chris Lepkowski, RA, Org Leadership, Policy/Dev
Date(s): November 15, 2013
Location: St. Louis, MO

Utilizing the Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) survey of undergraduates at large, public research universities (n = 1,016), the purpose of this study was to investigate the association between participation in formal research opportunities, students’ sense of belonging, and students’ perception of campus climate for gender among women enrolled in STEM majors. The results suggest that women’s participation in undergraduate research with faculty—either as volunteers or for course credit—was negatively associated with women’s sense of belonging and perceptions of campus climate for gender.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Preparing Future Citizens and Leaders by Developing College Students' Multicultural Competence

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Matt Johnson, Central Michigan University
Date(s): November 16, 2013
Location: St. Louis, MO

Utilizing a multi-institutional survey of college seniors (n = 5,922), the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between colleges’ contributions to undergraduates’ multicultural competence, students’ leadership development, and their sense of civic responsibility. Results suggest that colleges’ contributions to students’ multicultural competency are positively associated wlith students’ leadership development and civic responsibility.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

AIRUM 2013

Parental Divorce and Undergraduate Students' Success

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Sarah Linder, University of Minnesota
Date(s): November 7, 2013
Location: Bloomington, MN

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between parents' marital status and first-year college students' success at a large, public university. Utilizing data from the 2007-2008 CIRP survey of first-year students, in addition to qualitative data from 18 student interviews, the results of this study suggest that parental divorce is an important predictor of students' immediate and long-term success. Students from divorced families had a significantly (p < .05) lower grade point average and had significantly lower rates of first-to-second year retention, four-year persistence or graduation, and five-year persistence or graduation. Several themes emerged from qualitative data analysis, including financial challenges, difficulties establishing relationships with peers, and greater family responsibilities.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Student Learning Outcomes: Interpretations, Development, and Validity

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR , Laury Gorny, OIR , Alex Granquist, University of Minnesota and Sarah Frost, University of Minnesota
Date(s): November 8, 2013
Location: Bloomington, MN

Higher education institutions often rely upon students' self-reported development in measuring learning outcomes; yet, self-reported learning and development gains are hotly contested. This presentation describes the results of two qualitative research studies designed to measure students' interpretation of survey items assessing learning and development, in addition to the evidence students provide regarding the types of experiences leading to their development.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

MCPA 2013

Using Strengths to Mentor Students

Presented By: Katy Hinz, Office for Undergraduate Engagement , Kelly Bryant, University of St. Thomas and Krista M. Soria, OIR
Date(s): November 4, 2013
Location: Rochester, MN

Since fall 2011, the University of Minnesota Twin-Cities has offered over 10,000 incoming first-year students the Clifton StrengthsFinder inventory within a larger framework of the StrengthsQuest higher education program. This presentation highlights a collaborative campus-wide approach to building students’ strengths, with a focus on how to use strengths through mentorship in a variety of student affairs divisions and how this can greatly benefit students. This presentation will also assist practitioners seeking to implement one-to-one strengths-based activities into their own professional practice, their unit, and/or at their institution.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Fr Seminar Wksp 2013

A Snapshot of First-year Students @ the U of M

Presented By: Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR
Date(s): April 19, 2013
Location: Minneapolis, MN

Presentation made at the Freshmen Seminar Workshop for Faculty at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities campus. Presentation highlighted demographic and academic profiles of first-year (FY) at the U, examined survey results by FY on factors related to academic engagement and GPA, examined participation in freshmen seminars and illustrated survey results by those who enroll in freshmen seminars vs. not and the relationship with academic performance.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

AIR 2013

Connecting the Campus Around the Student Experience

Presented By: Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR , David E. H. Peterson, OIR and Peter M. Radcliffe, OPA
Date(s): May 19-22, 2013
Location: Long Beach, CA

This poster provides an overview of a cost effective open source campus decision-support system that incorporates student survey data resources and institutional data for a large public research university. Though developed within a large university environment, the technical process, open-source software, and implementation are applicable across all types of institutions. Utilization ranges in both depth and breadth, including program evaluation, service enhancement, college and program assessment, accreditation and accountability, and research. The approach outlined provides a common language and base of evidence around which we can convene conversations on our campuses about the student experience.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Library Data and Student Success

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Shane Nackerud, University Libraries
Date(s): May 20, 2013
Location: Long Beach, CA

Academic libraries, like other university departments, are increasingly asked to demonstrate their value to institutions. This study presents the results of analyses predicting the relationships between library usage and first-year students’ retention, college experiences, and academic success at a large, public research university. Usage statistics were gathered across 13 different library access points and outcomes were derived institutionally (e.g., retention, grade point average) and aggregated through student surveys (e.g., academic engagement, scholarship activity). This presentation won AIRUM's "best of region" presentation.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file.  Video Link to an external file or site. 

AERA Conference 2013

Examining Financial Decisions and Actions among Undergraduates from Different Social Class Backgrounds

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Brad Weiner, Office of Undergraduate Education
Date(s): April 28, 2013
Location: San Francisco, CA

Low-income and working-class students face many challenges related to the costs and affordability of higher education; yet, little is known about the ongoing financial decisions made by low-income and working-class students while they are currently enrolled in higher education and how those decisions might differ from those made by their middle/upper-class peers. This paper examines the different financial decisions and behaviors of undergraduate students from five social class backgrounds using data from undergraduates enrolled at 11 large, public research universities in 2010. Results suggest that low-income and working-class students are more likely to make decisions that could negatively impact their immediate academic experience, serve as disruptive barriers to success, delay or prolong graduation, or lead to increased debt upon graduation.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

NASPA Conference 2013

Exploring 'Invisible' Social Class in Fraternities and Sororities

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Georgianna Martin, University of Southern Mississippi
Date(s): March 18, 2013
Location: Orlando, FL

Social class is often recognized as an “invisible” diversity characteristic, although social class identity may be more salient for working-class students in higher education. This presentation examines the participation of students from different social classes in Greek Life at several large, public universities. Relying upon survey and document analysis, this program increases awareness of social class and provides suggestions on how campuses can create an affirming and welcoming space for working-class students in Greek Life.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Focusing on the First Year 2013

Dusting Off the Data: Using the 2007 CIRP Data to Predict First-Year Students’ Four-Year Outcomes

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR
Date(s): February 12, 2013
Location: Minneapolis, MN

In summer 2007, the majority of first-year (non-transfer) students (4,500+) completed the Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP) survey during Orientation sessions at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. The CIRP provides practitioners and administrators with valuable insights into college student behaviors, academic preparedness, college expectations, values and goals, motivations for attending the University, and interactions with peers and faculty. Four years later, it is time to take the data off the shelf, dust it off, and utilize this substantive source of information to examine factors predictive of first-year students’ first term/year grade point averages, ongoing retention, and four-year graduation rates. Practitioners and administrators attending this session can learn more about the factors (e.g. behaviors, goals, expectations, etc.) predicting first-year students’ retention, graduation, and grade point averages. The results of these analyses can be used to promote data-driven decision-making for the purposes of developing interventions to reach out to the students most at risk for attrition and prioritizing initiatives to enhance students’ long-term success.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

NISTS 2013

High-Impact Practices: Implications for Transfer Students’ Intellectual and Interpersonal Development

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR
Date(s): February 1, 2013
Location: Dallas, TX

This presentation describes the results of data analyses from a multi-institutional survey of undergraduates who attended six large, public research universities in 2012. Transfer students’ participation in high-impact practices (Kuh, 2008)—in addition to the association between participation in high-impact practices and students’ intellectual and interpersonal developmental outcomes—will be discussed. This presentation is geared toward attendees interested in research and assessment, the benefits of high-impact practices, and transfer students’ development.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file.  Handout Link is a PDF file. 

LEI 2012

Assessing the Benefits of Undergraduate Leadership at Research-Intensive Universities: Evidence from the SERU Survey

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and June Nobbe, Director of Student Development and Leadership Programs
Date(s): December 9, 2012
Location: Columbus, OH (The Ohio State University)

The benefits of undergraduate leadership participation are often overlooked, especially at research intensive universities, where the undergraduate experience competes with other institutional priorities. This session shares results from the SERU survey and provides evidence for the benefits of participation in undergraduate leadership across large, public research universities, with a focus on assessment of the leadership minor at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. The data shared will provide useful evidence for leadership educators seeking to justify investment in undergraduate leadership opportunities.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

AIRUM 2012

Library Data and Student Success

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Shane Nackerud, University Libraries
Date(s): November 9, 2012
Location: Bloomington, MN

This presentation was delivered at the annual Association for Institutional Research Upper Midwest conference. Staff at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities Libraries undertook a pilot project to measure how often, and in what ways, students used the Libraries’ various services. Partnering with the University’s Office of Institutional Research, Libraries staff also investigated whether students who use library services tend to be more successful academically or had higher retention. This presentation highlights the results of data collection and analyses.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

ASHE 2012

Alternatives to Study Abroad

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Jordan Troisi, University of Mississippi
Date(s): November 16, 2012
Location: Las Vegas, NV

This presentation was delivered at the annual Association for the Study of Higher Education conference. Colleges and universities are increasingly internationalizing their curricular and co-curricular efforts on campuses; subsequently, it is important to compare whether participation in study abroad or on-campus global/international activities may be associated with students’ self-reported development of global, international, and intercultural (GII) competencies. This study examined undergraduate students’ participation in study abroad and on-campus global/international activities within nine large, public research universities in the United States (n = 15,807). Framed within contact theory and person-environment-interaction theory, the results of this study suggested that students’ participation in activities related to internationalization at home—participation in on-campus global/international activities such as enrollment in global/international coursework, interactions with international students, and participation in global/international co-curricular activities—may yield greater benefits than study abroad for students’ development of GII competencies.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

College Student Leadership and Social Change

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Chris Lepkowski, RA, Org Leadership, Policy/Dev
Date(s): November 16, 2012
Location: Las Vegas, NV

This presentation was delivered at the annual Association for the Study of Higher Education conference. Colleges are under increasing pressure to develop future citizens who are interested in--and capable of--creating positive social change and improving their communities. Using data from the multi-institutional SERU survey, this study suggests students' participation in leadership positions can promote their engagement in social change.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Library Assessment Conf 2012

Using What you Collect: Library Data and Student Success

Presented By: Shane Nackerud, University Libraries , Jan Fransen, University Libraries and Krista M. Soria, OIR
Date(s): October 29 - October 31,
Location: Charlottesville, VA

Presented at the 2012 Library Assessment Conference, this poster describes the results of a collaborative assessment project undertaken by the University Libraries and the Office of Institutional Research. Results suggest a positive association between students' library use and students' retention and academic success. This poster won the "Judges' Choice" award at the conference.

Presentation Resources: Poster Link is a PDF file. 

NSSR 2012

Find Your Friends on Facebook: The Estimated Impact of Online Social Networks on Student Success

Presented By: Daniel R. Jones-White, OIR , Andrea Galliger, OIR and Holley Locher, Augsburg College
Date(s): October 29 - October 31,
Location: New Orleans, LA

Utilizing a random sample of 836 first-time, full-time freshmen at the University of Minnesota we track the inclusion of students in the University's Facebook network at the end of the fall 2007 term and explore its potential relationship with a student's first-year retention decision. While simply joining the University of Minnesota's Facebook network does not appear to impact a student's retention decision, we find that the number of friends a student identifies within the University's social network is positively related to student retention. Additionally, we find that in addition to size, the structure of student's social network is also related to a student's retention decision.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

AEA 2012

Developing an Integrative, Inclusive Framework For Undergraduate Assessment: Supporting Data Managers and Decision-Makers At A Decentralized University

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR
Date(s): October 26, 2012
Location: Minneapolis, MN

Presented at the American Evaluation Association annual conference, this presentation was featured in a panel of two other universities from the Twin Cities. A large, public research university typically has several stakeholders spanning across the state in which it is located; consequently, responding to the needs of these diverse constituents requires strategic planning. Further, challenges in collecting student data, reporting the data to constituents, and sharing the results of data-driven decisions made with student data can be exacerbated in a highly decentralized environment. This portion of the presentation highlights the ways in which a small institutional research office at a large, public university has proactively shared the results of assessment research and student data with the university community, developed effective partnerships across the university with regard to data analysis and reporting, and created a framework for undergraduate assessment.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

MCPA 2012

Strengths at the U: Creating a Strengths-Based Undergraduate Experience

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR , Katy Hinz, Office for Undergraduate Engagement and Robin Stubblefield, Office for Undergraduate Engagement
Date(s): October 18, 2012
Location: Century College, White Bear Lake, MN

Presented at the Minnesota College Professionals Association, this discussion focuses on the assessment of the StrengthsQuest initiatives at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. Since fall 2011, the University of Minnesota Twin-Cities has offered over 10,000 incoming first-year students the Clifton StrengthsFinder inventory within a larger framework of the StrengthsQuest higher education program. This workshop highlights a collaborative campus-wide approach to building students’ strengths, with a focus on providing insights, strategies, and recommendations to practitioners seeking to implement strengths-based activities with students, integrate a strengths-based philosophy on campus, and build a firm foundation for assessment.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Class(ism) in Co-Curriculars? Investigating Low-Income and Working Class Students' Participation in Co-Curricular Activities

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Victoria Svoboda, Associate Dean of Students, University of St. Thomas
Date(s): October 18, 2012
Location: Century College, White Bear Lake, MN

Presented at the Minnesota College Professionals Association, this discussion focuses on the engagement of low-income and working-class students in higher education. Research suggests that students from lower social class backgrounds are historically underrepresented in higher education, less likely to feel a sense of belonging on campus, and less likely to persist toward graduation. This presentation examines intersections between students' social class and their participation in the types of co-curricular experiences that can enhance students' belonging and retention. In increasing their awareness of social class, student affairs practitioners can discover institutional and structural barriers preventing lower/working-class students from full participation in college.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

NACADA 2012

Advising Scholars with Blue Collars

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Mark Bultmann, Office of Undegrad Ed
Date(s): October 5, 2012
Location: Nashville, TN

Presented at the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) annual conference, this presentation provides insights into the experiences of working-class students in large, public research universities. Using the Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) national survey, results indicate that working-class students have less engagement and a lower sense of belonging as compared to their middle/upper-class peers. Practical strategies that academic advisers can use to engage working-class students in large universities are discussed.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

AIR 2012

Deconstructing Delta: Explaining Educational Costs Through Analysis of the Instructional Portfolio

Presented By: Peter M. Radcliffe, OPA
Date(s): June 5-7, 2012
Location: New Orleans, LA

Presented at the Association for Institutional Research annual forum. Assessing the cost of higher education has become a critical policy priority. However, this effort is frustrated by limited information and standards. The Delta Cost Project has attempted to address this by assembling data on costs across sectors and levels of higher education, but their reports create as much confusion as clarity. Analysis shows that the overwhelming majority of variance in educational spending between institutions can be explained by differences in the disciplinary and degree level portfolio. Accounting for these differences allows institutions to benchmark themselves and overseers to evaluate the performance of their institutions.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file.  Paper Link is a PDF file.  Model Link is a Excel file. 

Examining Class in the Classroom: Utilizing Social Class Data in Institutional and Academic Research

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Will Barratt,
Date(s): June 5, 2012
Location: New Orleans, LA

Presented at the Association for Institutional Research annual forum, this presentation presents information about the use social class indicators in institutional and educational research.Social class and related indicators (socioeconomic status, parental education, and other forms of social/cultural capital) are strong determinants of students’ access and success in higher education. This presentation explores the use of different social class indicators in institutional and academic research, with a focus on the theoretical basis for social class, current demographic trends in higher education, the advantages/disadvantages to measuring social class, and the credibility of students' self-identification in a social class. Using the Student Experience in the Research University survey, the study also examines differential relationships between social class variables on students' sense of belonging on campus.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Defining First-Generation Students by Degrees: Implications for Research, Policy, and Practice

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Laury Gorny, OIR
Date(s): June 5, 2012
Location: New Orleans, LA

Presented at the Association for Institutional Research annual forum, this presentation presents information about the use of parental education variables among college students. Many scholars, federal agencies, and institutions define first-generation students using different criteria; furthermore, most researchers collapse students into dichotomous categories of first-generation/non-first-generation. Both strategies of defining first-generation students may mask important insights about first-generation students--insights that can be highlighted by using a differentiated definition of first-generation status based on varying degrees of parents' educational attainment. Using the multi-institutional Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) survey, this paper presents evidence that suggests a more nuanced understanding of parents’ educational achievement can highlight the unique experiences of students from different parental educational backgrounds and potentially benefit research, policy, and practice.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

A Holistic Assessment of a Campus-wide Initiative to Build Strengths: From Building a Conceptual Framework to Reporting Results

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR
Date(s): June 5, 2012
Location: New Orleans, LA

This IR in Practice session conveys information related to the assessment of an innovative, campuswide utilization of a strengths-based, positive psychology framework. In fall 2011, the University of Minnesota Twin-Cities (UMNTC) offered 5,400 new first-year students the StrengthsFinder assessment within a larger framework of the StrengthsQuest higher education program. This session discusses the approaches UMNTC used in developing a conceptual framework for the assessment of strengths outcomes, describes the measures and instruments used in assessment, and discusses the collaborations developed between institutional research, student affairs, and academic affairs.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

SERU Symposium 2012

Developing a Model of the Inuence of Service-Learning on Academic and Social Gains with the SERU Survey

Presented By: Andrew Furco, Associate Professor - Org Leadership, Policy/Dev , Daniel R. Jones-White, OIR , Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR and Laury Gorny, OIR
Date(s): May 4, 2012
Location: Berkeley, CA

Presented at the 6th annual SERU/UCUES Research Symposium. In this research paper, we utilize data from the Community and Civic Engagement Module of the multi-institutional Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) survey in order to estimate potential direct andindirect effects of community engagement experiences on undergraduate students' academic and social gains. A latent variable structural equation model of student achievement was developed to explore the potential relationship between participation in community-based learning activities (including enrollment in a course with a service-learning component and involvement in community based research) and students' perceptions of academic and cultural development. Specifcally, our empirical investigation addresses two questions: Does participation in community-based learning opportunities contribute, either directly or indirectly, to participating students' improved academic learning and skills; and does participation in community-based learning opportunities contribute, either directly or indirectly, to participating students' prosocial skills development? We also refect on key issues to consider when using SERU data that are related to community-based learning, and the Community and Civic Engagement Module.

Presentation Resources: Paper Link is a PDF file. 

ACPA 2012

Career Development Courses and Social Capital

Presented By: Becky Hall, Office for Student Affairs , Sara Nagel Newberg, Director Career and Internship Services, CCE, CDES, CFANS and Krista M. Soria, OIR
Date(s): March 26, 2012
Location: Louisville, KY

Held at the annual American College Personnel Association convention, this presentation highlights research conducted in partnership with Career Services at the University of Minnesota. Using a sample of first-year students who completed the Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) survey (n = 1,864), of whom approximately one-third (n = 666) enrolled in career courses, this study suggests that students who enrolled in career courses are more socially involved than those who did not enroll in career courses. Contending that social involvement increases students' social networks, it is suggested that career courses can, in turn, increase students' social capital.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Working-Class College Students: Engagement, Belonging, and Social Capital

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR
Date(s): March 26, 2012
Location: Louisville, KY

Held at the annual American College Personnel Association convention, this presentation suggests that students who identify as working-class have lower social capital because they experience more difficulty finding classmates with whom to study, faculty/staff to help them navigate campus, and people on campus who share their backgrounds and experiences. Using Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) data, it was also discovered that working-class students have a lower sense of belonging compared to their middle/upper-class peers. Suggestions to create a welcoming campus climate for working-class students are included.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

High Impact Practices and Graduate School Aspirations among Underrepresented STEM Students

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Simone Z Gbolo, College of Science and Engineering
Date(s): March 26, 2012
Location: Louisville, KY

Given the disproportionately low numbers of underrepresented minorities (URM) in STEM career, promoting the graduate school aspirations of URM STEM students is crucial in continuing to diversify the STEM workforce; consequently, it is important for universities to identify high-impact practices that can encourage URM STEM students to aspire to graduate education. This presentation explores the relationship between participation in high-impact practices and graduate school aspirations among URM STEM students at 11 large, public research universities. The results suggest that URM STEM students who participate in community service and research with faculty are twice as likely to aspire to graduate education compared to their peers who did not engage in those high-impact practices.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

ICCC 2012

Major Decisions: Implications for Engagement, Satisfaction, and Belonging

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR , Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR and LeeAnn Melin, Office of Undergraduate Education
Date(s): March 23, 2012
Location: Twin Cities

This poster presentation highlights the global and intercultural engagement of UMNTC students. Using Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) data, it was discovered that over 80% of UMNTC students interact with students from outside the U.S. in classes and in social settings occasionally to very often. Additionally, some elements of intercultural/global engagement lead to greater development in intercultural/global skills than other activities.

Presentation Resources: Poster Link is a PDF file. 

Tate Conference for Academic Advising 2012

Major Decisions: Implications for Engagement, Satisfaction, and Belonging

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Michael J Stebleton, Postsecondary Teaching and Learning
Date(s): March 8, 2012
Location: Twin Cities

Held at the annual Tate Conference for Academic Advising, this presentation used Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) data and investigated the relationship between students' reasons for choosing their academic majors and their academic engagement and sense of belonging. Students who tended to choose majors for intrinsic or internal extrinsic reasons tended to have higher engagement and sense of belonging, whereas students who choose majors for external extrinsic reasons tended to have less engagement and sense of belonging.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

First Year Experience 2012

Blue Collar Scholars: Engagement and Integration among Working-Class First-Year Students

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR
Date(s): February 20, 2012
Location: San Antonio, TX

Presented at the 31st Annual Conference on the First Year Experience, this poster presentation addresses differences in sense of belonging, academic engagement, and mental health between working-class and middle/upper-class first-year undergraduate students. Utilizing the Student Experience in the Research University survey, administered to 240,000+ undergraduate students enrolled at 10 large, public universities in 2010, this study suggests that working-class students have lower sense of belonging and higher rates of depression and stress as compared to their middle/upper-class peers.

Presentation Resources: Poster Link is a PDF file. 

Extended Orientations: Enhancing the Sense of Belonging of First-Year Students

Presented By: Beth Lingren Clark, Orientation and First-Year Programs , Laura Coffin Koch, Undergraduate Education and Krista M. Soria, OIR
Date(s): February 19, 2012
Location: San Antonio, TX

Held at the 31st Annual Conference on the First Year Experience, this study examined the academic and social benefits of new student orientation (Welcome Week) at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. Utilizing the Student Experience in the Research University survey, administered to all first-year students in 2010, this study suggests that students who participated in Welcome Week had a higher sense of belonging, higher fall and spring semester cumulative grade point averages, and higher retention from their first-year to their second year. These benefits persisted when controlling for additional demographic, college experience, and engagement factors.

Presentation Resources: Handout Link is a PDF file.  Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Advising Satisfaction: Implications for First-Year Students' Sense of Belonging and Retention

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR
Date(s): February 21, 2012
Location: San Antonio, TX

This study examined the relationship between advising satisfaction and first-year students' sense of belonging and retention to their second year. Using the Student Experience in the Research University survey, this study suggests that students' satisfaction with faculty, peer, college/staff, and department advisers is positively predictive of their sense of belonging while only students' satisfaction with college/staff advisers is predictive of their retention.

Presentation Resources: Handout Link is a PDF file.  Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Academic Advisior Network

A Snapshot of Undergraduate Data at the U of M

Presented By: Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR
Date(s): December 8, 2011
Location: 101 Walter Library, Minneapolis, MN

A presentation/tour of various undergraduate data sources available on the OIR website that may be useful for academic advisors of undergraduates.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

IARSLCE 2011

Community-Engaged Learning and Academic Gains in College

Presented By: Andrew Furco, Associate Professor - Org Leadership, Policy/Dev , Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR , Daniel R. Jones-White, OIR and Krista M. Soria, OIR
Date(s): November 2 - 4, 2011
Location: Chicago, IL

Presented at the International Association for Research on Service-learning and Community Engagement (IARSLCE) 2011 Annual Conference in Chicago from November 2-4, 2011

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

AIRUM 2011

Beyond Retention: Community Service for Leadership and Social Change

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR , June Nobbe, Director of Student Development and Leadership Programs and Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR
Date(s): October 27 - 28, 2011
Location: Bloomington, MN

Presented at the 2011 meeting of the Association of Institutional Research in the Upper Midwest (AIRUM).

This presentation examines the relationship between participation in community service and the development of leadership values among a random sample of 1,107 undergraduates who took the Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership (MSL) survey at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. The MSL is an annual, national survey of leadership development among college students. It explores the role of higher education in developing leadership capacities with a special focus on specific environmental conditions that foster leadership development. The MSL is developed under the Social Change Model (HERI, 1996), which describes leadership as a purposeful, collaborative, values-driven process. Its central principles—social responsibility and change for the common good—are assessed through eight core values that describe students’ level of self-awareness and ability to work with others.


Using the framework of the Social Change Model (HERI, 1996) and Astin’s (1993) Input-Environment-Output model, multiple regression was used to examine the relationship between participation in community service and the eight core values when controlling for demographic factors, precollege participation in activities, and precollege leadership antecedents. This presentation highlights these findings and demonstrates an effective partnership between institutional research and student affairs.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Victims of Our Success: How OIR Survived the Flood of Ad-Hoc Requests for Faculty/Staff Satisfaction Survey Data

Presented By: Leonard S. Goldfine, OIR
Date(s): October 27 - 28, 2011
Location: Bloomington, MN

Presented at the 2011 meeting of the Association of Institutional Research in the Upper Midwest (AIRUM).

In 2009, the University of Minnesota Office of Institutional research, in partnership with a steering team of selelct faculty and the Of- fice of Communications launched a massive effort to redesign its biennial HR survey, whose results in past years had been largely ignored by Uni- versity policy makers. In addition to a substantial paring down of the sur- vey instrument, the standard University-, Campus- and College-level re- ports were redesigned to provide more and immediate and actionable in- formation. This sparked a greater demand for more detailed drill- downs. To encourage greater use of this wealth of data, OIR developed an Excel-based ad-hoc report generator to quickly provide results for the seemingly infinite variations on the most commonly asked-for types of reports. To date, since its development less than a year ago, OIR has re- leased over 250 reports to administrators at all levels.

This presentation is a demonstration of how a combination of project plan- ning and some clever Excel tools allowed us to quickly and easily prepare customized reports for campus clients. Items that will be discussed in- clude our template/design model, our possibility matrix for determining whether or not a request for drill-down data meets minimum privacy standards, and Excel tools such as pivot tables, lookup tables, and macros that saved OIR from being buried by the fruits of its success.

Note: This is the first video to utilize our new screen capture software. Len has recorded the presentation and it can be viewed using the Video resource.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file.  Video Link to an external file or site. 

AIR 2011

Assessing the Impact of a First Year Learning Community for Less Prepared and Well Prepared Students at a Research University

Presented By: Cathrine Wambach, Associate Professor - Post Secondary Tchg/Lrng and Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR
Date(s): May 25th, 2011
Location: Toronto, Canada

Presented at the 2011 Annual Association of Institutional Research Forum.

This study compared the outcomes for less prepared and well prepared first year college students enrolled in learning communities at the University of Minnesota. Less prepared students were retained at the same rate, though their first year grades were significantly lower. In a second study the less prepared students were compared to an earlier cohort of matched pairs. The matched pairs had similar rates of retention and similar grades. A third study compared the responses of less prepared and well prepared students to items on the SERU survey. Less prepared students reported more gains in items related to the learning outcome communicating effectively. Less prepared and more prepared students reported similar gains on the outcome appreciating diversity. Less prepared students were as satisfied as well prepared students with their sense of belonging to the institution and were as likely to say they would choose to attend the same institution again, but they were less satisfied with their grades, social experience and academic experience.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

The experiences of first-generation students at large, public research universities: Engagement and Outcomes

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR and Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR
Date(s): May 25th, 2011
Location: Toronto, Canada

Presented at the 2011 Annual Association of Institutional Research Forum.

Greater numbers of students from non-college educated families are enrolling in higher education than ever; as the numbers of first-generation college students increases on college campuses (Choy, 2001), so do concerns about their success rates as compared to their non-first generation peers. This paper examines the academic and social engagement of first-generation college students who attended large, public research universities in 2009. It was found that first-generation students have lower levels of academic and social engagement as compared to their non-first-generation peers. Additionally, regression analyses were used to examine the association between academic and social engagement factors and academic and developmental outcomes among first-generation students so that administrators and practitioners can focus their efforts in areas that are associated with student outcomes.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Apples to Apples: Using AAUDE Faculty-by-CIP Data to Account for Discipline Differences in Faculty Salaries

Presented By: Leonard S. Goldfine, OIR and Peter M. Radcliffe, OPA
Date(s): May 25th, 2011
Location: Toronto, Canada

Presented at the 2011 Annual Association of Institutional Research Forum.

Popular methods that attempt to account for discipline in salary studies such as subdividing the population by discipline or market proxies that estimate supply and demand of new Ph.D.s fall short of their intended explanatory power or lead to inappropriate conclusions due to misunderstandings of the nature of academic faculty markets. This study demonstrates how the single variable: average peer institution faculty salary by CIP within rank – obtained from the American Association of Universities Data Exchange (AAUDE) – dramatically improves the predictive power of a salary model, accounting for more than 80% of the variance for assistant professor salaries alone.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Freshmen Seminar Workshop

A Snapshot of First-year Students @ the U of M

Presented By: Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR
Date(s): August 24th, 2011
Location: University of Minnesota - Twin Cities

Presentation made at the Freshmen Seminar Workshop for Faculty at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities campus.

Presentation highlighted demographic and academic profiles of first-year (FY) at the U, examined survey results by FY on factors related to academic engagement and GPA, examined participation in freshmen seminars and illustrated survey results by those who enroll in freshmen seminars vs. not and the relationship with academic performance.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

CSRDE Webinar Series 2011

Priced Out? Does Financial Aid Affect Student Success?

Presented By: Daniel R. Jones-White, OIR , Peter M. Radcliffe, OPA and Linda Lorenz, OIR
Date(s): June 2011
Location: Online Webinar

Presented for the 2011 CSRDE Webinar Series. The Symposium was sponsored by the Consortium for Student Data Exchange (CSRDE).

While the literature on postsecondary student success identifies important academic and social factors associated with student outcomes, one question that persists concerns the influence of financial aid. We use the Nation Student Clearinghouse's StudentTracker service to develop a more complete model of graduation, transfer success, or dropout.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Focusing on the First Year 2011

Mapping the Academic and Social Engagement of First-Year Students @ UMNTC

Presented By: Krista M. Soria, OIR , Michael J Stebleton, Postsecondary Teaching and Learning and Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR
Date(s): February 16th, 2011
Location: Minneapolis, MN

Presented at the Focusing on the First Year conference on the Twin Cities campus.

Nationally, student attrition is more likely to occur in a student's first-year of college (Pascarella & Terenzini, 2005). Retention literature often points to the importance of academic and social engagement of students in their persistence and completion (Kuh, 2009); therefore, this study examines the academic and social engagement of first-year students at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. Academic engagement factors, such as preparedness for class, time spent reading and studying for class, and contributions to classes will be explored. Additionally, social engagement factors, such as participation in clubs or organizations, time spent socializing with friends or partying, and sense of social belonging will also be examined. The data is drawn from the 2010 Student Experience in the Research University survey, which was completed by approximately 2,000 first-year students in spring 2010.

In addition to developing a picture around first-year students academic and social engagement, this study further explores the relationship between academic and social engagement and students' cumulative grade point averages; for example, preliminary findings indicate that academic disengagement behaviors, such as turning in assignments late and skipping class, have a negative relationship with grade point average, while positive engagement behaviors, such as revising papers before submission and contributing to class discussions, have a positive relationship with grade point average. This presentation will provide participants with an enhanced understanding of the academic and social engagement of first-year students at the University of Minnesota.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

NASPA 2010

Do I Belong Here? Exploring Immigrant College Students' Satisfaction Levels at Large, Research Universities

Presented By: Michael J Stebleton, Postsecondary Teaching and Learning and Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR
Date(s): November 8 - 9, 2010
Location: Minneapolis, MN

Presented at the NASPA 2010 Annual Conference, NASPA is also known as Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education.

Immigration issues inevitable impact student affairs professionals. With greater numbers of immigrant students accessing higher education, it is important to explore relevant issues, needs, and strategies. Using the Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) survey, this workshop will highlight immigrant students' sense of belonging and satisfaction responses. Specific learning outcomes for student affairs professionals and educators will be included.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file.  CSHE Publication Link is a PDF file. 

AIRUM 2010

Staff Work Satisfaction: An Analysis of the Unexamined Majority in Academia

Presented By: Leonard S. Goldfine, OIR and Min Young Cha, OIR
Date(s): October 27 - 29, 2010
Location: Bloomington, MN

Presented at the 2010 meeting of the Association of Institutional Research in the Upper Midwest (AIRUM).

Higher education is a labor-intensive industry (Johnsrud, 2002; Levin, 1991). As in any other organization, understanding what satisfies its personnel is essential for improving productivity. However, how staff members perceive, respond, and behave to pay, benefit, and other workplace-related issues has not been studied with as much intensity as for faculty groups. Their jobs in academia are becoming increasingly professionalized: important for supporting academic productivity and managing administrative efficiency.

Given the classical duality theory by Herzberg (1959) and existing models for administrative job satisfaction (Volkwein & Zhou, 2003), this paper investigates how seniority and job category explain the satisfaction of staff members, as well as with other factors at a large, public, research-intensive institution. The data used are from a biennial system-wide employment satisfaction survey and analyzed using multiple linear regression. Out of 18,719 invitees for the 2010 survey, Instructional Professionals and Administrators and other Staff represent 79% of the survey population.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Plug and Play: Developing a Flexible Program Assessment Model

Presented By: Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR , Peter M. Radcliffe, OPA and Daniel R. Jones-White, OIR
Date(s): October 27 - 29, 2010
Location: Bloomington, MN

Presented at the 2010 meeting of the Association of Institutional Research in the Upper Midwest (AIRUM).

The presentation will outline a program assessment design for improving the educational and personal experiences of University of Minnesota students. A recent assessment of a scholarship program for at-risk students will be used to illustrate the approach.

Donors, alumni relations and academic affairs units are often involved in the development of scholarship programs aimed at improving the success of at-risk students. Often these programs have a financial, programmatic and/or advisory component aimed at improving student success. Collaborations across these units with institutional research and assessment professionals can provide meaningful exchanges of ideas/perspectives and open up unique opportunities for assessing the impact of participation in these programs.

Student success is often measured in terms of academic performance, retention and graduation rates. Plugging a general program participation variable into comprehensive regression model of student success provides a baseline for assessing the effectiveness of a program while controlling for the effects of other factors. Used in conjunction with qualitative approaches [i.e., focus groups, surveys] we can broaden our outcomes of interest as needed. Along with developing a standard reporting template, this approach provides a flexible framework for assessing similar programs in a timely, consistent, and responsible manner that serves multiple needs.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Serving to Learn: Does Community Based Learning Participation Contribute to More Desirable Student Outcomes?

Presented By: Daniel R. Jones-White, OIR , Krista M. Soria, OIR and Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR
Date(s): October 27 - 29, 2010
Location: Bloomington, MN

Presented at the 2010 meeting of the Association of Institutional Research in the Upper Midwest (AIRUM).

Given the increasing emphasis on public engagement on many college campuses, it is important to assess the extent to which engagement opportunities provide meaningful and valuable experiences for college students. While there is growing evidence to support the notion that public engagement opportunities (e.g. service-learning, volunteerism) contributes to student academic success, Eyler, Giles, and Gray (1999) caution that there is no consensus on the impact of engagement experiences and academic achievement indicators, such as grade point average. Given the apparent lack of agreement in the research, this study attempts to identify if there is a relationship between participation in community based learning activities and first-year achievement in college. To assess if there is an independent relationship between participating in different communitybased activities and first-year student grade point average, this study utilizes a sample of first-time, full-time freshmen students enrolled at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities in Fall 2009 who participated in a unique survey of student engagement (the SERU survey) administered during Spring 2010.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

The Politics of Equity Research

Presented By: Leonard S. Goldfine, OIR and Peter M. Radcliffe, OPA
Date(s): October 27 - 29, 2010
Location: Bloomington, MN

Presented at the 2010 meeting of the Association of Institutional Research in the Upper Midwest (AIRUM).

The neutrality of an IR office can be put to the test when tasked with conducting an equity study. Even the best intentioned and well reasoned study is subject to political considerations that have little to do with the pursuit of truth. From considerations of what variables to include in a regression model to interpretation of results, what it said, how it is said, and from whom a message comes are all as important as any actual statistical results.

This session presents a road map to some of the pitfalls an IR office can face when asked to perform an equity study. Resources from the literature as well as anecdotal experience are used to illustrate the often exasperating decisions and negotiations institutional researchers will have to face when moving beyond the realm of pure research and into studies that could have a large and immediate impact on the University and its employees and students lives.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

AIR 2010

Priced Out?: Does Financial Aid Affect Student Success?

Presented By: Daniel R. Jones-White, OIR , Peter M. Radcliffe, OPA and Linda Lorenz, OIR
Date(s): May 30 - June 2, 2010
Location: Chicago, IL

Presented at the 2010 Annual Association of Institutional Research Forum.

Presentation Resources: Paper Link is a PDF file. 

AIRUM 2009

What is it that satisfies faculty?: Rank as a consideration in factors related to job satisfaction.

Presented By: Gina M. Johnson, N/A
Date(s): October 29-30, 2009
Location: Bloomington, MN

Presented at the 2009 meeting of the Association of Institutional Research in the Upper Midwest (AIRUM).

Presentation Resources: Paper Link is a PDF file. 

Developing a Focused Structured Student Outcomes Assessment Program Experience at a Large Public University

Presented By: Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR
Date(s): October 29-30, 2009
Location: Bloomington, MN

Presented at the 2009 meeting of the Association of Institutional Research in the Upper Midwest (AIRUM).

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

CSRDE 2009

Priced Out? Does Financial Aid Affect Student Success?

Presented By: Daniel R. Jones-White, OIR , Peter M. Radcliffe, OPA and Linda Lorenz, OIR
Date(s): October 1-2, 2009
Location: Buffalo, NY

Presented at the 2009 National Symposium on Student Retention. The Symposium was sponsored by the Consortium for Student Data Exchange (CSRDE).

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Analysts-Group 2009

Reporting with the New Racial and Ethnic Data

Presented By: Linda Lorenz, OIR
Date(s): October 1, 2009
Location: Minneapolis, MN

Presented at the University of Minnesota Analysts Group meeting.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

AIR 2009

Counting Out Time: Utilizing Zero Modified Count Regression to Model Time-to-Degree Attainment.

Presented By: Daniel R. Jones-White, OIR , Peter M. Radcliffe, OPA , Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR and John P. Kellogg, OIR
Date(s): May 30-June 3, 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA

Presented at the 2009 Annual Association of Institutional Research Forum.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Redefining Student Success: Assessing Different Multinomial Regression Techniques for the Study of Student Retention and Graduation Across Institutions of Higher Education.

Presented By: Daniel R. Jones-White, OIR , Peter M. Radcliffe, OPA , Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR and John P. Kellogg, OIR
Date(s): May 30-June 3, 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA

2008 AIR Best Paper presented at the 2009 Annual Association of Institutional Research Forum.

Presentation Resources: Paper Link is a PDF file.  Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Seamless Transitions?: Institutional, Demographic, and Course-Specific Effects on Transfer Student Success in Next-In-Sequence Coursework.

Presented By: Leonard S. Goldfine, OIR
Date(s): May 30-June 3, 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA

Presented at the 2009 Annual Association of Institutional Research Forum

Presentation Resources: Paper Link is a PDF file. 

Shifting Student Demographics and Their Impact on a Midwestern Higher Education Institution's Transformation: Preparing for Change.

Presented By: Christina Frazier, OIR , Rich Howard, OIR , Barbara Banks, N/A and John P. Kellogg, OIR
Date(s): May 30-June 3, 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA

Presented at the 2009 Annual Association of Institutional Research Forum

Presentation Resources: Summary Paper Link is a PDF file.  Paper Link is a PDF file.  Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

AIR 2008

Hitting a Moving Target: Navigating the Landscape of Ever-Changing College Rankings.

Presented By: Leonard S. Goldfine, OIR , Daniel R. Jones-White, OIR , Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR and Giljae Lee, OIR
Date(s): May 24-28, 2008
Location: Seattle, WA

Presented at the 2008 Annual Association of Institutional Research Forum.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Redefining Student Success: Assessing Different Multinomial Regression Techniques for the Study of Student Retention and Graduation Across Institutions of Higher Education.

Presented By: Daniel R. Jones-White, OIR , Peter M. Radcliffe, OPA , Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR and John P. Kellogg, OIR
Date(s): May 24-28, 2008
Location: Seattle, WA

Presented at the 2008 Annual Association of Institutional Research Forum.

Presentation Resources: Paper Link is a PDF file.  Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

AIRUM 2007

Correlations Between Average Faculty Salaries and Institutional Rankings for Top-ranked Institutions.

Presented By: Leonard S. Goldfine, OIR , Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR and Daniel R. Jones-White, OIR
Date(s): October 25-26, 2007
Location: Bloomington, MN

Presented at the 2007 meeting of the Association for Institutional Research Upper Midwest.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

Identifying Factors Related to Student Success: Utilizing Multinomial Logit Regression to Study Graduation in Higher Education.

Presented By: Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR , Peter M. Radcliffe, OPA , Daniel R. Jones-White, OIR , John P. Kellogg, OIR and Giljae Lee, OIR
Date(s): October 25-26, 2007
Location: Bloomington, MN

Presented at the 2007 meeting of the Association for Institutional Research Upper Midwest.

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

CSRDE 2007

Modeling Student Academic Success: Does Usage of Campus Recreation Facilities Make a Difference?

Presented By: Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR , Anthony K. Brown, Rec Sports , Giljae Lee, OIR , John P. Kellogg, OIR and Peter M. Radcliffe, OPA
Date(s): September 24-26, 2007
Location: Milwaukee, WI

Paper presented at the 2007 National Symposium on Student Retention. The Symposium was sponsored by the Consortium for Student Data Exchange (CSRDE).

Presentation Resources: Paper Link is a PDF file.  Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

AIR 2007

Modeling the Incidence and Timing of Student Attrition: A Survival Analysis Approach to Retention Analysis

Presented By: Peter M. Radcliffe, OPA , Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR and John P. Kellogg, OIR
Date(s): June 2-6, 2007
Location: Kansas City, MO

Paper presented at the 2007 National Symposium on Student Retention. The Symposium was sponsored by the Consortium for Student Data Exchange (CSRDE).

Presentation Resources: Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

AIRUM 2006

Modeling the Incidence and Timing of Student Attrition: A Survival Analysis Approach to Retention Analysis

Presented By: Peter M. Radcliffe, OPA , Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR and John P. Kellogg, OIR
Date(s): November 2-3, 2006
Location: Bloomington, MN

Paper presented at the 2006 meeting of the Association for Institutional Research Upper Midwest.

Presentation Resources: Paper Link is a PDF file.  Presentation Link is a PDF file. 

CSRDE 2006

Identifying Students at Risk: Utilizing Survival Analysis to Study Student Athlete Attrition

Presented By: Peter M. Radcliffe, OPA , Ronald L. Huesman, Jr., OIR and John P. Kellogg, OIR
Date(s): October 9-11, 2006
Location: Bloomington, MN

Paper presented at the 2006 National Symposium on Student Retention. The Symposium was sponsored by the Consortium for Student Data Exchange (CSRDE).

Presentation Resources: Paper Link is a PDF file.  Presentation Link is a PDF file.